Saying More with Less: Eduardo Galeano interviewed by Jonah Raskin

Authors

  • Jonah Raskin

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.14452/MR-061-05-2009-09_3

Keywords:

Marxism

Abstract

Eduardo Galeano, who was born in Uruguay in 1940, has written big, thick books. Open Veins of Latin America (1973), which Hugo Chávez of Venezuela handed to Barack Obama in May, hoping it would teach him history, is more than 300 pages. Then there's Galeano's Memory of Fire Trilogy: Genesis, Faces and Masks, and Century of the Wind that adds up to nearly 1,000 pages. More recently, he has written shorter books, and practiced a kind of ecology of the word. Mirrors, his newest work, contains more than one hundred short entries about almost everything — from salt to maps and money, and almost everyone, from Cleopatra to Alexander Hamilton and Che Guevara. None of the entries is longer than a single page. Not surprisingly, Galeano's answers to the questions in this interview are pithy, poetic, humorous, and sometimes oblique. "I'm fighting word inflation, which in Latin America is worse than monetary inflation," he says. "I try to say more with less — because less is more." -J.R.

Published

2009-10-03

Issue

Section

Articles