Chile After Allende: A Tale of Two Coups

Authors

  • James Petras

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.14452/MR-025-07-1973-11_2

Keywords:

History

Abstract

As the policies of Chile's military rulers unfold, differences have already appeared among the anti-Allende forces in the United States as well as in Chile. The differences are not insignificant insofar as they reflect not only changes in personnel (civilian vs. military), but different positions regarding forms of political rule, the role of the military, and socio-economic policy. What appeared as a united effort between political parties and military officers to prevent the "communization of Chile" is no longer visible. The stronger party to the coup, the military, has discarded its political associates, the Frei-led Christian Democrats (PDC), and feels free to impose its own policies through direct representation in the government. In this the military has the support of the smaller upper-class-based National Party and the terrorist ultra-right Fatherland and Liberty group (together representing about 20 percent of the electorate).

Published

1973-12-02

Issue

Section

Articles