Monthly Review https://monthlyreviewarchives.org/index.php/mr <p>This site contains nearly all articles published in <em>Monthly Review</em> since its inception in May 1949. Current subscribers can access content free of charge. Learn more about <em>MR</em>&nbsp;<a title="Monthly Review" href="http://monthlyreview.org/about" target="_self">at the main website</a>.</p> Monthly Review Foundation en-US Monthly Review 0027-0520 <p>Please see <a title="Reprint Permissions" href="https://monthlyreview.org/contact/reprint-permissions/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">here for reprint requests</a>.</p> The great denial https://monthlyreviewarchives.org/index.php/mr/article/view/6021 <p>A new poem by Marge Piercy.</p> Marge Piercy Copyright (c) 2021 https://monthlyreview.org/contact/reprint-permissions/ 2021-01-03 2021-01-03 61 61 10.14452/MR-072-08-2021-01_7 Standing with Standing Rock, Then and Now https://monthlyreviewarchives.org/index.php/mr/article/view/6020 <p>The story of the Indigenous movement to stop the Dakota Access Pipeline in 2016 and 2017 has been the subject of numerous articles and documentaries, many of which depict it mainly as an environmental and climate justice campaign to stop the pipeline from crossing the Mni Sose (Missouri River), just north of the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation in North Dakota. Nick Estes and Jaskiran Dhillon's edited collection <em>Standing with Standing Rock</em> tells a richer and more complex story of decolonization and indigenization from the frontlines.</p> Zoltán Grossman Copyright (c) 2021 https://monthlyreview.org/contact/reprint-permissions/ 2021-01-03 2021-01-03 54 60 10.14452/MR-072-08-2021-01_6 Fighting the "Immigrant Threat" Narrative https://monthlyreviewarchives.org/index.php/mr/article/view/6019 <p>Ruth Milkman's latest book is a strong scholarly response to the "immigrant threat" narrative that has been central to U.S. politics in the last decades. In <em>Immigrant Labor and the New Precariat</em>, the distinguished labor and migration scholar has a clear goal: to reframe the conversation about migration and increased inequality in the United States, reversing the causal relation that blames migration for the U.S. working class's current perils.</p> Lola Loustaunau Copyright (c) 2021 https://monthlyreview.org/contact/reprint-permissions/ 2021-01-03 2021-01-03 52 53 10.14452/MR-072-08-2021-01_5 A Portrait of Gil Green https://monthlyreviewarchives.org/index.php/mr/article/view/6018 <p>Gil Green was a revolutionary who became J. Edgar Hoover's "most wanted man in America" until voluntarily surrendering to authorities in February 1956. He lived a life of integrity and courage.</p> Michael Myerson John J. Simon Copyright (c) 2021 https://monthlyreview.org/contact/reprint-permissions/ 2021-01-03 2021-01-03 43 51 10.14452/MR-072-08-2021-01_4 Disability and Welfare under Monopoly Capitalism https://monthlyreviewarchives.org/index.php/mr/article/view/6017 <p>A historical-materialist analysis of the relationship between disability, the body, welfare, and capitalism is needed in order to further develop a Marxist understanding of disability. In this framework, we can see how the British welfare state, given recent changes to British disability policy, determines who is able-bodied and who is disabled, with this evaluation made in regard to the needs of monopoly capitalism.</p> David Matthews Copyright (c) 2021 https://monthlyreview.org/contact/reprint-permissions/ 2021-01-03 2021-01-03 30 42 10.14452/MR-072-08-2021-01_3 The Continuing Korean War in the Murderous History of Bombing https://monthlyreviewarchives.org/index.php/mr/article/view/6016 <p>The Korean War, which broke out on June 25, 1950, can be considered the epicenter of bombing as an instrument of war. For one, it was the first—and, so far, the last—time since 1945 that the United States seriously considered using atomic weapons during the course of an imperial war. It was the first war that the United States did not win. It ended in a stalemate—an armistice—that continues until today. Kinetic fighting was suspended, but the war continues (though only by one side) by what is conveniently but simplistically called <em>sanctions</em>.</p> Tim Beal Copyright (c) 2021 https://monthlyreview.org/contact/reprint-permissions/ 2021-01-03 2021-01-03 21 29 10.14452/MR-072-08-2021-01_2 The Contagion of Capital https://monthlyreviewarchives.org/index.php/mr/article/view/6015 <div class="buynow"><a title="Back issue of Monthly Review Volume 72, Number 8 (January 2021)" href="https://monthlyreview.org/product/mr-072-08-2021-01/">buy this issue</a></div> <p>We are extremely pleased to announce that John Bellamy Foster, editor of <em>Monthly Review</em>, has won the prestigious Deutscher Memorial Prize for 2020 for his <em>The Return of Nature: Socialism and Ecology</em>.</p> John Bellamy Foster R. Jamil Jonna Brett Clark Copyright (c) 2021 https://monthlyreview.org/contact/reprint-permissions/ 2021-01-01 2021-01-01 1 19 10.14452/MR-072-08-2021-01_1 Notes from the Editors, January 2021 https://monthlyreviewarchives.org/index.php/mr/article/view/6014 <div class="buynow"><a title="Back issue of Monthly Review Volume 72, Number 8 (January 2021)" href="https://monthlyreview.org/product/mr-072-08-2021-01/">buy this issue</a></div> <p>We are extremely pleased to announce that John Bellamy Foster, editor of <em>Monthly Review</em>, has won the prestigious Deutscher Memorial Prize for 2020 for his <em>The Return of Nature: Socialism and Ecology</em>.</p> - Editors Copyright (c) 2021 https://monthlyreview.org/contact/reprint-permissions/ 2021-01-03 2021-01-03 c2 63 10.14452/MR-072-08-2021-01_0 The Left and the Class Struggle https://monthlyreviewarchives.org/index.php/mr/article/view/6013 <p>Both Toni Gilpin's <em>The Long Deep Grudge</em> and Michael Goldfield's <em>The Southern Key</em> offer ample evidence that the grand era of U.S. labor history scholarship is not yet past. <em>The Long Deep Grudge</em> is in equal parts labor history and family reminiscence as Gilpin seeks the fuller story of her father, who played a leadership role in the United Auto Workers union. <em>The Southern Key</em> is in many ways a study of a different variety, but very much of a similarly militant kind. Goldfield, a labor activist veteran himself, draws the big picture of what he sees as the central failure of the U.S. left: the failure to organize the South.</p> Paul Buhle Copyright (c) 2021 https://monthlyreview.org/contact/reprint-permissions/ 2020-12-01 2020-12-01 57 54 10.14452/MR-072-07-2020-11_5 Decolonization in Practice https://monthlyreviewarchives.org/index.php/mr/article/view/6012 <p>Fundamental to Kari Marie Norgaard's <em>Salmon and Acorns Feed Our People</em> is the seizure of land most evident in the overtly violent era of state-sanctioned frontier genocide and forced relocation of the Karuk. Settler colonialism, Norgaard reminds us, is an ongoing state-led project up to this day—it is not just a moment relegated to the past and, thus, the inherent treatment of Native Americans as relics of U.S. history must be challenged.</p> Leontina M. Hormel Copyright (c) 2021 https://monthlyreview.org/contact/reprint-permissions/ 2020-12-01 2020-12-01 50 56 10.14452/MR-072-07-2020-11_4