From Mass Incarceration to Mass Coercion

  • Mark Jay
Keywords: Incarceration, History, Inequality

Abstract

From the mid-1960s to the late 2000s, the number of people locked in U.S. prisons and jails, and forced onto parole or probation, increased from less than eight hundred thousand to more than seven million. From the beginning, this explosive growth, known commonly as mass incarceration, has been about containing, stigmatizing, and exploiting the poorest sectors of the working class. While an important prison reform movement has been underway for many years, private forces have attempted to co-opt this movement and have implemented and profited from alternative forms of mass coercion proliferating throughout society.

Published
2019-12-01
Section
Articles

Most read articles by the same author(s)