Beyond the Degradation of Labor: Braverman and the Structure of the U.S. Working Class

  • R. Jamil Jonna
  • John Bellamy Foster
Keywords: Political Economy, Labor

Abstract

Harry Braverman's Labor and Monopoly Capital, first published forty years ago in 1974, was unquestionably the work that, in the words of historian Bryan Palmer, "literally christened the emerging field of labor process studies." In the four decades since its appearance Braverman's book has continued to play a central role in debates on workers' struggles within industry, remaining indispensable to all attempts at in-depth critique in this area.… This continuing relevance of Braverman's analysis has to do with the fact that his overall vision of the transformations taking place in modern work relations was much wider than has usually been recognized. Viewed from a wide camera angle, his work sought to capture the complex relation between the labor process on the one hand, and the changing structure and composition of the working class and its reserve armies on the other. This broad view allowed him to perceive how the changes in the labor process were integrally connected to the emergence of whole new spheres of production, the decomposition and recomposition of the working class in various sectors, and the development of new structural contradictions.
Published
2014-10-01
Section
Review of the Month