Notes from the Editors, January 2014

Authors

  • - The Editors

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.14452/MR-065-08-2014-01_0

Keywords:

Political Economy

Abstract

On November 16, 2013, Paul Krugman published a piece on his New York Times blog entitled "Secular Stagnation, Coalmines, Bubbles, and Larry Summers," consisting of an extended commentary on former Clinton Treasury Secretary and Obama economic advisor Lawrence Summers's November 8 presentation to the IMF's Economic Forum.… Krugman, in following up on Summers's IMF speech, highlighted Alvin Hansen's theory of secular stagnation in the 1930s to '50s.… [acknowledging that] long-term economic stagnation…was now "the norm" for the economy, not the exception.… Writing in a fashion that could have come straight out of Monthly Review at any point in the last forty years, he declared: "We now know that the economic expansion of 2003–2007 was driven by a bubble. You can say the same about the later part of the 90s expansion; and you can in fact say the same about the later years of the Reagan expansion, which was driven at that point by runaway thrift institutions and a large bubble in commercial real estate." But in trying to understand how stagnation itself came about and created this whole irrational set of economic conditions, Krugman…failed to draw attention to the much more important problem of investment under conditions of overcapacity and mature industry, as well as the whole question of monopolistic/oligopolistic capitalism—all of which were taken seriously at some level by Hansen, and were developed in a far more radical way by socialist thinkers such as Michał Kalecki, Joseph Steindl, Paul Baran, and Paul Sweezy.

Published

2013-12-31

Issue

Section

Notes from the Editors