This Isn't What Democracy Looks Like

Authors

  • Robert W. McChesney

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.14452/MR-064-06-2012-10_1

Keywords:

Media

Abstract

On the brink of the 2012 presidential election, and without considering that electoral contest itself, it is useful to comment on the state of U.S. democracy. The most striking lesson from contemporary U.S. election campaigns is how vast and growing the distance is between the rhetoric and pronouncements of the politicians and pundits and the actual deepening, immense, and largely ignored problems that afflict the people of the United States.… Mainstream politics seem increasingly irrelevant to the real problems the nation faces…. The degeneration of U.S. politics is a long-term process.… capitalism and democracy have always had a difficult relationship. The former generates severe inequality and the latter is predicated upon political equality.… Capitalist democracy therefore becomes more democratic to the extent that it is less capitalist (dominated by wealth) and to the extent to which popular forces—those without substantial property—are able to organize successfully to win great victories…. In the past four decades such organized popular forces in the United States—never especially strong compared to most other capitalist democracies—have been decimated, with disastrous consequences. The United States has long been considered a "weak democracy"; by the second decade of the new century that is truly an exaggeration. Today, the United States is better understood as what John Nichols and I term a "Dollarocracy"—the rule of money rather than the rule of the people—a specifically U.S. form of plutocracy.

Published

2012-11-01

Issue

Section

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