Notes from the Editors, July-August 2012

Authors

  • - The Editors

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.14452/MR-064-03-2012-07_0

Keywords:

Global Economic Crisis, Political Economy

Abstract

As the economies of Europe, North America, and Japan continue to stagnate orthodox economics has revealed itself to be bankrupt, unable to explain what is happening much less what to do about it. It was not the failure to see the "Crisis of 2008" coming that represents the economics profession's biggest failure, Paul Krugman declared in a recent talk, but what came after: "the profession's descent into uninformed quarreling," coupled with its reversion to Say's Law (the notion that supply creates its own demand)—the disproof of which was the main achievement of the Keynesian revolution.… Yet… [no] prominent orthodox analyst, has sought to engage in a genuine overhaul of received economics on the level of what Keynes accomplished in the 1930s. Indeed, no such scientific revolution appears possible within mainstream economics today, which is characterized not by its realism but its irrealism—serving now an entirely ideological function. Here one is reminded of Paul Sweezy's observation nearly fifty years ago: "Bourgeois economics, I fear, has irrevocably committed itself to what Marx called 'the bad conscience and evil intent of apologetic.' If I am right, Keynes may turn out to be its last great representative"

Published

2012-06-30

Issue

Section

Notes from the Editors