Notes from the Editors, June 2012

Authors

  • - The Editors

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.14452/MR-064-02-2012-06_0

Keywords:

Literature, Media

Abstract

By any measure, Adrienne Rich lived an exemplary life. When she died last March 27, aged eighty-two, she was acknowledged by many critics as perhaps this country's foremost poet.… Throughout her writing life, Adrienne Rich's vision of a better world was clear. In her 2008 collection A Human Eye: Essays on Art in Society Rich claimed Che Guevara, Karl Marx, and Rosa Luxemburg as defining heroes. It did not matter if she was speaking to a room full of undergraduates or, having made the long painful climb up the hill to the Women's Correctional Facility in Bedford Hills, New York, to teach poetry to its inmates, Adrienne's voice was trenchant. So it was not surprising that when the commercial media ran obituaries of her, they sanitized her life and work, giving more emphasis to her awards than her work, characterizing her as angry rather than radical. At MR however, we preferred to hear her words: "Responsibility to yourself means refusing to let others do your thinking, talking, and naming for you; it means learning to respect and use your own brains and instincts; hence, grappling with hard work" (from "Claiming an Education," 1977).

Published

2012-05-31

Issue

Section

Notes from the Editors