Notes from the Editors, October 2010

Authors

  • - The Editors

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.14452/MR-062-05-2010-09_0

Keywords:

Political Economy

Abstract

To understand the disaster that is present-day economics, it is crucial to recognize that we are living today, not only in the deepest economic crisis/stagnation since the Great Depression, but also—as Paul Krugman declared in his New York Times blog on January 27, 2009—in "A Dark Age of Macroeconomics," in which the central discoveries of the 1930s have been forgotten or discarded. "What made the Dark Ages dark," Krugman wrote, "was the fact that so much knowledge had been lost, that so much known to the Greeks and Romans had been forgotten by the barbarian kingdoms that followed." The critical knowledge lost that gave rise to the new Dark Age in Macroeconomics, he claimed, was none other than the Keynesian Revolution centered on the critique of Say's Law, or the notion that supply creates its own demand. In the context of arguing against government deficit spending, leading economists at the University of Chicago, the bastion of reaction in economics, have reverted to a "pure Say's Law, pure 'Treasury view'" by insisting that increased savings automatically lead to increased investment, while government borrowing invariably "crowds out" investment

Published

2010-09-30

Issue

Section

Notes from the Editors