Empire and Multitude

Authors

  • Samir Amin

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.14452/MR-057-06-2005-10_1

Keywords:

Imperialism

Abstract

Michael Hardt and Antonio Negri have chosen to call the current global system "Empire."* Their choice of that term is intended to distinguish its essential constituent characteristics from those that define "imperialism." Imperialism in this definition is reduced to its strictly political dimension, i.e., the extension of the formal power of a state beyond its own borders, thereby confusing imperialism with colonialism. Colonialism therefore no longer exists, neither does imperialism. This hollow proposition panders to the common American ideological discourse according to which the United States, in contrast to the European states, never aspired to form a colonial empire for its own benefit and thus could never have been "imperialist" (and thus is not today anymore than yesterday, as Bush reminds us). The historical materialist tradition proposes a very different analysis of the modern world, centered on identification of the requirements for the accumulation of capital, particularly of its dominant segments. Taken to the global level, this analysis thus makes it possible to discover the mechanisms that produce the polarization of wealth and power and construct the political economy of imperialism

Published

2005-11-01

Issue

Section

Review of the Month