The Illusions of Empire

Authors

  • Bashir Abu-Manneh

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.14452/MR-056-02-2004-06_5

Keywords:

Imperialism

Abstract

Michael Hardt and Antonio Negri's Empire, published by Harvard University Press in 2000, took the intellectual world by storm. After the declared demise of "grand narratives" and projects of human emancipation, here came a book that told the grandest of all stories, the totalization of capital, and anticipated the most magnificent of all revolutionary outcomes, communism. Postmodern taboos were shattered, or so it seemed. The prophets of the multitude, Hardt and Negri, were duly acknowledged and celebrated in the liberal press. In the United Kingdom, the New Statesman ran an interview with Negri entitled "The left should love globalization." Globalization, Negri stated, leads to real democratic "global citizenship." In the United States, New York Times reviewer Emily Eakin hailed Empire as the "next big idea," announcing the arrival of a badly-needed "master theory" to overcome the "deep pessimism," "banality" (Stanley Aronowitz's term), "crisis," and "void" that have characterized the humanities in the last decade. Empire (both book and concept) was good news for everyone, ushering in a period that, while difficult to define, is, in Hardt's words, "actually an enormous historical improvement over the international system and imperialism."

Published

2004-06-05

Issue

Section

Articles

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