The Political Economy of Women's Liberation: A Reprint

  • Margaret Benston
Keywords: Sex, Inequality

Abstract

The position of women rests, as everything in our complex society, on an economic base. - Eleanor Marx and Edward Aveling. The "woman question" is generally ignored in analyses of the class structure of society. This is so because, on the one hand, classes are generally defined by their relation to the means of production and, on the other hand, women are not supposed to have any unique relation to the means of production. The category seems instead to cut across all classes; one speaks of working-dass women, middle-class women, etc. The status of women is clearly inferior to that of men, but analysis of this condition usually falls into discussing socialization, psychology, interpersonal relations, or the role of marriage as a social institution. Are these, however, the primary factors? In arguing that the roots of the secondary status of women are in fact economic, it can be shown that women as a group do indeed have a definite relation to the means of production and that this is different from that of men.
Published
1989-12-05
Section
Reprise