The Politics of Self-Reliant Development

Authors

  • Jay R. Mandle

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.14452/MR-032-11-1981-04_2

Keywords:

Imperialism, Political Economy

Abstract

Since the early 1950s the countries of the English-speaking Caribbean have followed a classic pattern of dependent development. Following the recommendations of the Nobel Prize-winning economist W. Arthur Lewis, they have engaged in a policy of "wooing and fawning upon" foreign capitalists in an attempt to attract investment to the region." The effort at industrialization implied in this policy was in fact an advance over the previous British colonial policy which had confined the region to the plantation production of agricultural exports. But by the 1970s it had become clear that as a way of improving the living conditions of the bulk of the population of the region, "industrialization by invitation" was a failure. Everywhere in the West Indies unemployment rates were high and poverty persistent. As Lloyd Best has written, the hopes associated with the Lewis strategy "have been no more than grand illusions."

Published

1981-04-02

Issue

Section

Articles