Bread and Justice: The Struggle for Socialism in Guyana

Authors

  • Clive Y. Thomas

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.14452/MR-028-04-1976-08_2

Keywords:

Marxism

Abstract

The historical development of societies such as ours, which are based on antagonistic class relationships, has always been uneven. Whatever may be the surface manifestations—economic crisis, political conflict, war, famine, etc.—the fundamental sources of this uneven development lie in the unequal position in which groups of people stand in relation to the means of production and the struggles which develop among these groups for ownership of the means of production, and hence for control of the production or laboring process. While this has been true for all forms of class societies, it should be noted that the pattern of uneven development is very often reflected in the crises which from time to time confront the major institutions in the superstructure of these societies, viz., the trade unions, the political parties, the state, and so on. It is also frequently reflected in the pattern of development in the field of ideas—i.e., in the ideological struggles which occur in these societies.

Published

1976-09-02

Issue

Section

Articles