What Next in France?

Authors

  • F. G. Clarke

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.14452/MR-010-03-04-1958-07-08_2

Keywords:

History

Abstract

Paris, June 13.: The most remarkable first impression of Paris today is that of a city at peace. Except for the newspaper headlines, a constant reminder that nothing has yet been settled, there are few indications of the threats and alarms of civil war that shook the country only ten days ago. The police riot squads are out of sight. There are no street demonstrations of Right or of Left. No one has been tossed into prison. Although their deputies are on "vacation," the political parties are functioning as usual. The opposition press, uninhibited by censorship, minces no words in its attacks on the regime. With so little apparent change, an outsider gets the feeling that the drama which brought down the Fourth Republic, installed an authoritarian regime, and brought the nation to the threshold of a fascist-like military dictatorship, has occurred outside the everyday life of the people.

Published

1958-07-01

Issue

Section

Articles